Would the Hotel?

Is this the earliest recorded use of the modern, slang version of the word "ho?"

 Normally I hate puns, but this one is pretty amusing!

Normally I hate puns, but this one is pretty amusing!

Multiple sources indicate that the etymology of the word "ho" (etym-ho-logy?) is as an African-American dialectical pronunciation of the word "whore" which arose in the 1960s. Amazingly, this postcard was postmarked in 1911 - and I think it's pretty hard to imagine an alternate meaning of the card's pun. 

As is often the case, the reverse of the card has pretty much nothing to do with the front: 

 Sent to Buffalo, NY in September 1911. "My Dearest Lillian - Got your card today. Was sure glad to hear from you. Are you still at the falls? Or are you back to your work. I am just as busy as ever. Still on the go. The stork has not yet come to visit us, he is slow this time."

Sent to Buffalo, NY in September 1911. "My Dearest Lillian - Got your card today. Was sure glad to hear from you. Are you still at the falls? Or are you back to your work. I am just as busy as ever. Still on the go. The stork has not yet come to visit us, he is slow this time."

So is this the earliest example of the word "ho?" It seems crazy that it predates the previously documented origin of the word by 50 years. But again, what else could it mean!?